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Automatic Transport Ventilators

There are very few studies evaluating the use of automatic transport ventilators (ATVs) during attempted resuscitation in patients with endotracheal intubation.

During prolonged resuscitation efforts, the use of an ATV (pneumatically powered and time- or pressure-cycled) may provide ventilation and oxygenation similar to that possible with the use of a manual resuscitation bag, while allowing the Emergency Medical Services (EMS) team to perform other tasks.1,2 (Class IIb, LOE C)

Disadvantages of ATVs include the need for an oxygen source and a power source. Thus, providers should always have a bag-mask device available for manual backup. For additional information regarding support of airway and ventilation in the adult, see “Part 7:Adult Advanced Cardiovascular Life Support.”

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References

  1. Weiss SJ, Ernst AA, Jones R, Ong M, Filbrun T, Augustin C, Barnum M, Nick TG. Automatic transport ventilator versus bag valve in the EMS setting: a prospective, randomized trial. South Med J. 2005;98:970–976.
  2. Johannigman JA, Branson RD, Johnson DJ, Davis K Jr., Hurst JM. Out-of-hospital ventilation: bag–valve device vs transport ventilator. Acad Emerg Med. 1995;2:719–724.
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Automatic Transport Ventilators

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