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Manually Triggered, Oxygen-Powered, Flow-Limited Resuscitators

In a study of 104 anesthetized nonarrest patients without an advanced airway in place (ie, no endotracheal tube; patients were ventilated through a mask), patients ventilated by firefighters with manually triggered, oxygen-powered, flow-limited resuscitators had less gastric inflation than those ventilated with a bag-mask device.1

Manually triggered, oxygen-powered, flow-limited resuscitators may be considered for the management of patients who do not have an advanced airway in place and for whom a mask is being used for ventilation during CPR. (Class IIb, LOE C)

Rescuers should avoid using the automatic mode of the oxygen-powered, flow-limited resuscitator during CPR because it may generate high positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP) that may impede venous return during chest compressions and compromise forward blood flow.2 (Class III, LOE C)

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References

  1. Noordergraaf GJ, van Dun PJ, Kramer BP, Schors MP, Hornman HP, de Jong W, Noordergraaf A. Can first responders achieve and maintain normocapnia when sequentially ventilating with a bag-valve device and two oxygen-driven resuscitators? A controlled clinical trial in 104 patients. Eur J Anaesthesiol. 2004;21:367–372.
  2. Hevesi ZG, Thrush DN, Downs JB, Smith RA. Cardiopulmonary resuscitation: effect of CPAP on gas exchange during chest compressions. Anesthesiology. 1999;90:1078–1083.
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Manually Triggered, Oxygen-Powered, Flow-Limited Resuscitators

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